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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 85
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>>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." i'm uyl quan. tonight, our thoughts and prayers are with the families affected by the school shooting in newtown, connecticut. now, to help those of you who would like to talk about the incident with your children, we provided a link to some useful resources on our website. we hope it can be of some help today in the wake of this devastating tragedy. we move now to tonight's discussion. and joining me on the panel are aarti kohli, senior fellow at uc berkeley's warren institute on war and social policy. paul rogers, environmental writer with the "san jose mercury news." stephen sock, investigative reporter with nbc bay area. and from los angeles, david lazarus, columnist with "the l.a. times." aurti, let's start with you. uc berkeley announced a new scholarship program for undocumented students. why did the university feel it was necessary to support these students? >> well, yes it's very excites news. $1 million from the foundation. and the university really feels strong obligation to these students because th
in northern california." big news today from the u.s. supreme court on gay marriage. before we get to our other topics, we'll briefly discuss that with our panelists. joining me tonight are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle" education reporter. matthai kuruvila, also with the "san francisco chronicle." and paul rogers with "san jose mercury news." the high court announced it will review proposition 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end. as for how sweeping and how big of a decision we can expect, that's sort of the $64,000 question that court watchers were already speculating about today. are we going to get a narrow ruling one way or another on either one of these two cases or is it going to be one of those once in a generation social civil
election night win over republican rival mitt romney. california's public education system was saved from severe budget cuts with the november passage of governor brown's proposition 30, but voters didn't say yes to all taxes. an attempt to tax soda in richmond failed, as did a statewide tobacco tax on the june ballot. new districts drawn by a citizens commission and the voter-approved top two primary system shook up races for congress and the state legislature, putting a record number of freshmen in the assembly and giving democrats a rare supermajority in sacramento. it was the beginning of realignment of the state's criminal justice system, and voters approved reform of the state's tough three strikes sentencing law. the economy sputtered but finally showed signs of improvement in the housing and job market, but in silicon valley, the highly anticipated facebook ipo fell flat. the city of stockton made headlines as the largest city in the u.s. to ever file for bankruptcy. and a deadly shooting at oikos university in oakland left seven people dead and a community in shock. and obama car
. >>> good evening. i'm scott shaffer. welcome to this week in northern california. we'll hear from elect eric cal sw -- swalwell. michael montgomery, reporter for kqed and center for investigative reporting, and moore, professor of law. the u.s. supreme court convened today behind closed doors discussing whether or not to review a lower court ruling striking down california's proposition 8. their highly anticipated decision could come monday. as you well know, the supreme court gets seven to eight thousand requests for cases to be reviewed. how do they decide? they only pick 80 or so a year. what is the criteria and why would prop 8 be an important one to look at? >> it's how legal the precedent is and how national the question is, how many people it affects, and relatedly, how much lower courts are struggling over that and related questions. so in the prop 8 case, it's true the prop 8 is a california-specific measure, and it's also true that a ninth circuit ruling tried to make its ruling non-specific. california is such an important state and it occurs in dozens of other states and tha
it on, you can get it on your pants. paint. the kelly moore plant in san carlos, california, turns out nearly 40,000 gallons a day. it's one of the largest employee-owned paint operations in the u.s. part of a $13 billion industry domestically. 140 workers in the 15 acre san carlos facility, 1,500 world wide, including 150 retail outlets in seven states. >> we own currently 58% of the stock and the rest of the stock is owned by the moore family. >> mike: you like white? they got it. you like -- they got that, too. >> still seeing a lot of reds. that teal is slipping into it. teal and turquoise. green still kind of there still. yellows, yellow influence, neutrals are still there. but the teals and the reds and oranges. oranges are just really popular right now, too. >> i started off with. >> mike: steve devoe is chairman and c.e.o. of the 66-year-old company. he does not paint a pretty picture of what they and every other paint manufacturer has been through over the last couple years. what he does do is point out why kelly moore fared better than most. first, history. they have it. star
in there. >> i did. >> it goes to president obama from the marijuana growers in california because he promised he was going to back off of marijuana prosecutions in states where medicinal marijuana had been legalesed and they have continued up there in particular. this has been a very sore point in his base. >> well, do you think the president ought to know what the virtues of marijuana are? >> he ought to know and he ought to know before he makes a public statement before -- >> why. >>> he know? >> because he's president. >> oh. anything else? >> policy. >> afghan president hamid karzai who owns his own regime security to the u.s. backing but he openly attacks u.s. allies accusing of america of fostering corruption in afghanistan. and worse turn coat of the year karzai. okay. most boring, pat? >> the alan green span joe lieberman trophy this year, john, goes to harry reid. >> on my side of the political agenda, mitch mcconnell is a winner. and i would also include jon huntsman, who i think had an opening to really make an impression in the republican primaries and he sure didn't. >>
california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
at the university california berkeley last year demonstrated that at least half of that is because unemployment insurance keeps people attached to the job search and attached to the workforce, which we want. 9 heldrich center out of rutgers did a study as well around this time last year showing that workers who are unemployed who are receiving unemployment do more job search activities than those who don't get benefits and are willing to settle for lower paying jobs than those who are not getting benefits. >> brown: a final last word. >> certainly true, in the first few weeks of unemployment. are you out there, injure job skills are refresh, are you used to getting up and getting to, without. the long their goes on, the less you are doing all of those things. and now the structural problem is this. we have a huge body of people who have been out of the labor force so long that their skills are really-- we need to attend to this difference. so extending unemployment for humanitarian purposes, we probably should do that. but change the system so we have training involved. >> bill beech and judy c
than $1 billion and settle claims of sudden acceleration. court filings in california said the auto maker will install a brake override system in more than three million vehicles. it also will make direct payments to affected customers. the agreement is subject to approval by a federal judge. >> reporter: thousands of sunni demonstrators in western iraq staged a mass protest today against the shi-ite-dominated government, the third in less than a week. protesters filled the streets in ramadi in anbar province chanting "topple the regime." the demonstrations began after police arrested ten bodyguards assigned to the sunni finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. the party won power in this month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval
in the wake of the tragedy. stephen brock is a professor of school psychology at california state university in sacramento. he's a member of an emergency assistance team for the national association of school psychologists. dewey cornell is director of the youth violence project at the university of virginia. he is a forensic clinical psychologist. we hope to be joined by mo canady is the executive director of the national association of school resource officials, which works on school based policing and security. for now i want to welcome both stephen brock and dewey cornell. i will start with you stephen brock. you've dealt with this sort of thing before. what was your reaction when you heard this today? >> well, as a school psychologist, as a father, as a person who is no stranger to this kind of loss t was quite simply devastating. just a very sad day. >> warner: and dewey cornell. >> terrible tragedy and very frustrating that we weren't able to prevent this. >> let me stay with you, dewey cornell, you have as he said worked with this sort of thing. people look at this and think how coul
-production of kqed and the center for investigative reporting. >> in california's fields, things are changing. crops are less plentiful. >> we're seeing two-thirds of a reduction in volume out of our southern growing regions. >> insects are more abundant. >> our temperatures have increased by two to three degrees fahrenheit, and that seems to be enough to keep them from being frozen out during the winter. i did end up losing one field -- probably a quarter of a million dollar hit. >> water, already scarce, is now too salty to sustain crops. >> if you don't have enough quality water to farm, then there's limits to what we can do with genetics. >> coming up -- climate change pushes california growers to new limits.
california, cost an estimated $1 billion a day. netflix is blaming problems at its web service provider, amazon for a server outage that took down its streaming video service on christmas eve and into christmas day. netflix says it worked through the night with engineers at amazon to get the service back up and running. netflix shares rebounded today, rising almost 2%, while amazon shares fell nearly 4%. >> susie: amazon was just one of many stocks in the red today. as we mentioned earlier, stocks were dragged lower by the retail sector after a report showed consumers did not go all out this holiday shopping season. that sent shares of some of the nation's largest retailers lower. macy's fell 1%. upscale retailers coach and saks were hardest hit. walmart and best buy were also modestly lower. volume improved a bit from monday but was still light with many traders still on vacation. no surprise, consumer related stocks were some of the weakest performers in today trading. consumer discretionary and consumer staples each slid about 1%. a similar drop for utilities. a few court decisions o
here in california. you know, my girlfriends, we'd go to palm springs for the weekend and bain de soleil orange gelee which was basically like crisco for your skin. let's just put this and just bake in the sun, just bake because we all thought it was hot to have tans or whatever. obviously, there are things that you kind of look back and go, oh, wow. but for the most part, i'm finding a lot of humor in getting older. tavis: you mentioned humanity a moment ago. what is it about the humanity of children specifically that so turns you on, interests you as subject matter? >> because they're true. they're just the truest thing you're gonna find. here is the great irony. we're an adult. it's a book about bravery, about celebrating bravery in children in doing things for the first time, trying something new and succeeding. how often do we do that in our daily life? how often do we adults try new things? yet these children are so open and willing to try and willing to look foolish and stumble and fall. i think it's because, as we've gotten older, the media has made falling kind of like a
of los angeles and long beach, california reopened today after port operators and the worker's union reached an agreement late tuesday. the union said it won new protections against job outsourcing. port officials said during the walkout, they were unable to move some $760 million worth of cargo a day. wall street had a day of ups and downs and investors watched economic reports and weighed chances for a fiscal cliff deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 82 points to close at 13,034. but the nasdaq fell nearly 23 points to close at 2,973. the day's big loser was apple, down more than 6% over concerns that smart phone sales are lagging. former texas congressman jack brooks has died. he served 42 years in the house, and was in the dallas motorcade on november 22nd, 1963 when president kennedy was assassinated. hours later, brooks was on hand as vice president and fellow texan lyndon johnson was sworn in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks
. >> brown: now, we look to a california education experiment called the "rocketship" model that involves teachers, kids and parents and aims to expand to serve a million students someday. the "newshour's" special correspondent for education, john merrow, has our report. >> reporter: the model-t was the first. the first innovative and affordable car available to the masses. others had built good cars, but henry ford figured out how to build a lot of them. he and his moving assembly line proved that quality can be mass produced. mass production is a problem the auto industry solved over 100 years ago, but it's an issue our education system has yet to figure out. america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. john danner is the latest to give it a shot. he created an innovative charter school model with replication in mind. charter schools receive public funding but are privately managed and operate outside of the traditional public system. >> our p
to hear a challenge to californias gay marriage law. you can find that in our essential reads section at pbs.org/washingtonweek. keep up with daily developments with me over at the pbs newshour, and well see you again next week on washington week. good night. and happy hanukkah, everybody. >> funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management from real estate to retirement solutions, we've developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still, and that's one thing that will never -- never change. prudential. corporate funding for washington >> week is provided by -- norfolk southern, boeing. additional funding for "washington week" is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >>> every single bite needed to be -- >> twinkies in th
dark thirty." the film gets its california premiere tonight. >> it dramatizes the nighttime raid on a osama bin laden compound last year. it shows what led up to it, the decade long manhunt. there was one female cia officer who tracked down osama bin laden. >> women were pivotal to this kind. women and men. when at the center of this kind. that -- women at the center of this hunt. that was extremely surprising. they have their analysts, and they are in important positions. >> how truthful is your account? i know it is a feature film and not a documentary. are the basic outlines true? >> everything that happens on the screen is representative of firsthand accounts. >> it always had the potential to wimbledon president obama is image as a commanding leader -- embolden president obama's image as a commanding leader. the filmmakers have denied this. it is a film that will help the president. >> i think it does a lot for obama because what it does, it shows that obama has a cool, compost, meticulous commitment to achieve something the democratic presidents are never relied upon to ach
an impression around the globe. shankar died in california at the age of 92. his daughter norridge jones said he will be missed by music level -- nora jones said he will be missed by music lovers everywhere. >> it was not just music. it was a path to spiritual enlightenment. he started as an indian classical dancer and spent seven years learning the sitar. his fame quickly spread. it was george harrison who sought him out as part of his own spiritual quest which made him truly famous in the west. >> he is the only person who did not try to impress me. it was by his being he taught me so much without actually saying a word. it is by example. >> he has become one of the dearest people in my life, and i love him like my son, but we are at the same time great friends. >> george's sit are playing made its way into the beatles' own music. -- sitar playing made its way into the beatles' own music. shankar played at george harrison's concert for bangladesh in new york. he preferred to keep his distance. >> i could have made billions by now, but i never thought of that. i wanted to keep the sanctity of m
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment. health happens in neighborhoods. learn more. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. linda bradley is the founder of a program aimed at women of color called celebrate sisterhood. i read a piece that you wrote: 10 ways to put your doctor at of business and i was fascinated by what i saw and i thought to ask you. whether or not doctors really want to be put up of business and you know where i am going. there is so much money that is made in the medical profession. i wonder not to cast a person -- aspersion on you but how serious are wary about getting to a point where people do not need hospitals, they do not need doctors. they do not need the kinds of medical insurance we have. can you imagine a time when we will get to a place where we will be so healthy that we can put doctors out of business? >> i am optimistic that we can do that. doctors would relish the opportunity to take care of patients, to be looking at preventive ways to promote health. if
"coloring book. these trees are california grown. she had recently moved here from the other side of the country. you can see that people are coming to light candles. they're coming to lay flowers. they are also coming most poignantly with teddy bears. every tree has a group of soft toys for the departed child. this really is a most agonizing week. two funerals took place together. there are many more to come. >> laura, i saw earlier a crossed that had come all the way from rwanda. it was sent to this school in connecticut for the memorial. as you have seen here over the last few days, do you have a sense that the town has almost gone from a state of shock into a real grief and anger? >> this is the stage that everyone he last had anything to do with this tragedy will tell you this is one the great turns to anger. particularly in a case like this or they're so difficult to find any rational reason for what happens. the sense i also get is that people will tell you they do not want to be defined by what has happened here. in the and they want their strength and their love for their children, they
on the investigation and the reaction in connecticut and beyond. >> ifill: we talk with california senator dianne feinstein, who hopes to revive a law banning assault weapons.
. welcome to "this week in northern california." tonight we take a look back at
, lightning flashing inside like a giant christmas ornaments. a snowstorm all the way from california. it is triggering these explosions in the midtown area. lit only by the lights of police cruisers. thousands are without power. over a quarter of a million people are without power. >> we have had some moderate injuries. there have been no deaths reported. judging from some of the damage today, it is a miracle. >> residents to pick through the debris as rescue workers check for those trapped in the rubble. picking up cars and ripping through a high school. >> has predicted, the storm is on the move. these are the latest pictures from indiana. dangerous conditions are leaving many struggling to get around. snow was expected to fall on wednesday. residents are also dealing with freezing temperatures. france has sent troops to the central african republic to protect its embassy after protests outside of the compound. they accuse the former colonial power failing to stop the rebel advance. they threw stones and tore down a flight at the embassy. our west africa correspondent is following
%. that was 2006. california did the same thing in 2010. and both states got rid of partisan control of gerrymandering, drawing district lines. >> i remember when they when they redrew your district. suddenly you had a big "l." >> big upside-down "l," right. >> upside-down "l" that went all the way from oklahoma city up to the kansas border. >> yeah, and then halfway across to arkansas. yeah. as you know, bill, i represented oklahoma city. i'm a city guy. you know, to me, food comes from a grocery store and not, you know. i don't know anything about farming. but because i was a republican that won in a heavily democratic district, when we had a state legislature that was dominated by the democrats, you know, they redrew my district so that i was now representing wheat farmers and cattle ranchers and small town merchants. and i thought, "well, look what they did to me." but they didn't. they did it to those people who were entitled to be represented by somebody who could speak for them. you have to take away the ability of the parties to draw district lines in a way that take away rep
. democratic senator dianne feinstein of california has pledged to revive a law banning assault weapons. she is chairwoman of the senate intelligence committee. welcome senator >> thank you very much ifill: with the members getting an r-rating from the national rifle association, do you have any sense that things will be different now for the assault weapons ban than it has been in the past >> i have every sense that it's an uphill road. it was in the past when we did it in the past. i wrote that bill. my office wrote that bill. it went through. it was not amended. it went through the senate. the house. it was signed by the president. it was the law for ten years. i think what is unique about this is it's really just one class of gun. the assault weapon. the assault weapon is developed for military purposes, to kill in close combat. and it doesn't belong in the streets of our cities. it doesn't belong where it can be picked up easily by a grievance killer who can walk into a workplace, a mall, a theater, and now an elementary school and kill large numbers. >> ifill: explain to our viewers wh
for benghazi, for cutting funding for diplomatic security. california's barbara boxer: >> we need to get our priorities straight around here. and we can't walk away and invite another... another tragedy. and as much as people like to say, "well, it's not the money," it's the money. you can't... you can't protect a facility without the funding." >> reporter: but republicans asked why, in the case of benghazi, the state department did not shift funds or ask for emergency money. bob corker of tennessee minced no words in his assessment. >> what i saw in the report is a department that has sclerosis. that doesn't think outside the box. that is not using the resources that it has in any kind of creative ways. is not prioritizing. i cannot imagine sending folks out to benghazi after what we saw from the security cameras and the drones. >> reporter: deputy secretary burns said the answer, in part, is that despite growing lawlessness in benghazi, in his words, "we made the mistaken assumption that we wouldn't become a major target." >> the truth is, across eastern there had been a tendency-- not jus
-capacity ammunition magazines. california congressman mike thompson: >> i've been a hunter all my life and there's no reason to have a magazine that holds 30 shells. we're already restricted by law why do you need 30 shells in a magazine? it's an assault magazine. that's all it can be. call it what it is-- an assault magazine and we don't and we don't have any reason to assault anyone in our communities, in our neighborhoods. >> ifill: far from the political debate, in newtown, the day's six funerals included a service for 27-year-old teacher victoria soto who died trying to shield students from gunfire. and principle dawn hochsprung was laid to rest this afternoon. services were also held for two seven-year-olds-- daniel barden and chase kowalski-- and two six-year-olds, charlotte bacon and caroline previdi. but there were signs that the weight of crushing media coverage is wearing on the small town, even as revulsion over the killings reverberated through the business world. this week, a private equity firm said it would sell its stake in the company that makes the semi- automatic rifle used
in california reaches the final legal twist as the u.s. supreme court considers whether to take on proposition 8. the first three strikes prisoners are released after the passing of prop 36. the great bay
to reroute to ports in mexico, panama and northern california. a tentative deal was reached late last night after federal mediators joined negotiations. no details yet on the deal, but workers are expected to get new terms that will prevent jobs from being outsourced. >> tom: we saw the influence of apple on any stock index which includes it. without apple, the dow rallied. but the nasdaq and s&p 500 were weighed down thanks to apple's weakness. the s&p 500 hit its lowest level of the session just after a stronger than expected report on the services sector before 11:00 a.m. eastern time. it bounced into positive territory and closed up 0.2%. volume picked up a little on the big board with 757 million shares. 1.8 billion moved on the nasdaq. the technology sector was the big drag on the broad market. it fell 1.3%. the utility sector saw the best gains, up 1.6%. apple put the brakes on the broad market, selling off on heavier than usual volume. apple fell 6.4%, with the stock closing at a three-week low. there are plenty of trader theories behind the weakness in apple. they include apple not
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)

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